Building Experiences That Work Like The Web

Much has been said about the greatness of the Web, yet most websites don’t actually work like the Web does. And some experiences that aren’t even on the web can still embody its spirit better than the average site.

Here are three webbish characteristics that I want to see in every site I use, and which I try my best to implement in anything I build.

  • “View Source” for every piece of user-generated content. Many sites that support user comments allow users to use some kind of markup language to format their responses. Flickr allows some HTML with shortcuts for embedding other photos, user avatars, and photo sets; Github permits a delicious smorgasboard of HTML and Markdown.

    The more powerful a site’s language for content creation, the more likely it is that one user will see another’s content and ask, “how did they do that?”. If sites like Flickr and Github added a tiny “view source” button next to every comment, it would become much easier for users to create great things and learn from one another.

    I should note that by “source” I don’t necessarily mean plain-text source code: content created by Popcorn Maker, for instance, supports a non-textual view-source by making it easy for any user to transition from viewing a video to deconstructing and remixing it.

  • Outbound Linkability. Every piece of user-generated content should be capable of “pointing at” other things in the world, preferably in a variety of ways that support multiple modes of expression. For instance, a commenting system should at the very least make it trivially easy to insert a clickable hyperlink into a comment; one step better is to allow a user to link particular words to a URL, as with the <a> tag in HTML. Even better is to allow users to embed the content directly into their own content, as with the <img> and <iframe> tags.

  • Inbound Linkability. Conversely, any piece of user-generated content should be capable of being “pointed at” from anywhere else in the world. At the very least, this means permalinks for every piece of content, such as a user comment. Even better is making every piece of content embeddable, so that other places in the world can frame your content in different contexts.

As far as I know, the primary reason most sites don’t implement some of these features is due to security concerns. For example, a naïve implementation of outbound linkability would leave itself open to link farming, while allowing anyone to embed any page on your site in an <iframe> could make you vulnerable to clickjacking. Most sites “play it safe” by simply disallowing such things; while this is perfectly understandable, it is also unfortunate, as they disinherit much of what makes the Web such a generative medium.

I’ve learned a lot about how to mitigate some of these attacks while working through the security model for Thimble, and I’m beginning to think that it might be useful to document some of this thinking so it’s easier for people to create things that work more like the Web. If you think this is a good (or bad) idea, feel free to tweet @toolness.

If you'd like to respond, just tweet @toolness.